Path of Racial Discrimination Ends With Criminal Statutes

There are no other options. The only way to end race-based discrimination it to criminalize the behavior. Since its founding, America has moved along a tortured racial path. In 1776, the Declaration of Independence acknowledged a list of self-evident truths. Then, for four score and seven years, we proceeded to live a lie about . . . → Read More: Path of Racial Discrimination Ends With Criminal Statutes

Sous La Terre: Montgomery’s Underground Jazz Club

If you are a jazz aficionado and have never been to Sous La Terre, you owe it to yourself to go downtown one Friday or Saturday night and listen to Henry Pugh, Jr. play at this “Downtown-Underground” jazz club. For a quarter of a century, this Jazzman has entertained Montgomery’s jazz fans.

Henry Pugh . . . → Read More: Sous La Terre: Montgomery’s Underground Jazz Club

Missing Fathers Take Big Toll

Far too many of Alabama’s children are in trouble. They live in poverty; they lack access to health care; and they are caught up in the State’s overcrowded juvenile justice system. Much of this juvenile social pathology stems from homes with vanished fathers.

According to Professor Donald Bogie at Auburn University in Montgomery’s Center . . . → Read More: Missing Fathers Take Big Toll

James’ Appointments Troubling

In Alabama, racial tensions are manifest in all political and government activities, social and religious life, public and private educational institutions, the criminal justice system and nearly all economic matters. Given these tensions, it is not surprising that Governor James came under criticism for not appointing blacks to his staff.

There are only two . . . → Read More: James’ Appointments Troubling

White Males at Beginning of Race Talk

Last year, in an Austin, Texas speech, the president challenged the nation to begin an earnest conversation about race. This past spring in California, he announced establishment of a Presidential Commission to conduct a series of town meeting style hearings on race relations. It seems as if everyone in the country is talking about . . . → Read More: White Males at Beginning of Race Talk

Alabamians Need Choice of Marriages

A Time Magazine poll (July 1997) reveals a lot about how Americans feel about divorce. In the poll, 50 percent of respondents thought that it should be more difficult for married couples to get divorced. For couples with young children, the figure rose to 61 percent. Ironically, asked if the government should make divorce . . . → Read More: Alabamians Need Choice of Marriages

Social Costs of the Vanishing-Father

Far too many of Alabama’s children are in trouble. They live in poverty; they lack access to health care; and they are caught up in the State’s overcrowded juvenile justice system. Much of this juvenile social pathology stems from homes with vanished fathers.

According to Professor Donald Bogie at Auburn University in Montgomery’s Center . . . → Read More: Social Costs of the Vanishing-Father

Strikers Serious About Stand

The sun was hot on the UPS picket line, but the heat had not weakened the resolve of the strikers I spoke with. These Teamsters were determined to narrow the wage gap between part-time and full-time workers. The men I spoke with (I didn’t see any women strikers), last Wednesday, said they are committed . . . → Read More: Strikers Serious About Stand

Extortion Is Criminal, But So Is This Kind Of Child Abuse

The recent extortion trial and subsequent conviction of 22 year old Autumn Jackson by a New York Federal District Court, unfolded as a classic tragedy. A jury convicted Ms. Jackson of attempting to extort $40,000,000 from Bill Cosby, the famous television comic/actor/pitch-man. During the trial, Ms. Jackson claimed that she was “negotiating” with the man she believed to be her father. Jackson and co-defendants, Jose Medina, 51, a former tennis instructor, and Boris Sabas, 42, a small business owner, are scheduled for sentencing by Judge Barbara Jones in October. When they are sentenced, Jackson could receive up to 12 years in prison and $750,000 in fines. Under federal sentencing guidelines, Judge Jones can impose a lesser sentence if she determines that there are mitigating or unusual circumstances in the case. There are many. . . . → Read More: Extortion Is Criminal, But So Is This Kind Of Child Abuse

Lovings Case’s Lessons Linger

According to various news accounts, early on the morning of July 15, 1958, Richard and Mildred Loving awoke in their bed with three flashlights shining in their eyes. A voice behind the lights demanded, “What are you doing in bed with this lady?”

“I am his wife,” Mildred answered. Richard pointed to their five . . . → Read More: Lovings Case’s Lessons Linger