The Lawyer Most Responsible for Dismantling Segregation

This year marks forty years since Rosa Parks refused to relinquish her seat on a Montgomery City bus to a white man. Then, Alabama law required African American passengers to stand-up so that white riders could sit down when all seats were filled. Today, it is hard to imagine the Montgomery of 1955. Those . . . → Read More: The Lawyer Most Responsible for Dismantling Segregation

Events In Selma Changed Our World

The recent re-enactment of the Selma to Montgomery March commemorating the 1965 Voting Rights March created reflections and caused comparisons. Older people reflected upon their lives thirty years ago, while young people tried to grasp the significance of that historic event.

Much has changed in thirty years. Then, Governor George Wallace was determined to . . . → Read More: Events In Selma Changed Our World

Leaders Agree: Preserve Valuable History

Readers may recall the position this column took last year with respect to Black History Month. That column suggested we end the practice of defining and separating our history by race. On 7 November 1994, a group of Alabama’s civic and political leaders took an important step toward combining American civil rights history. U.S. . . . → Read More: Leaders Agree: Preserve Valuable History

Time To End Black History Month

It’s time to stop imposing a separate black history upon Americans. Black History Month divides society racially by highlighting a separate systematic account of what happened in the lives and development of Americans with African blood as opposed to the lives of Americans without African ancestry. Black History Month is the manifestation of a . . . → Read More: Time To End Black History Month

The Historical Record

February is Black History Month, and the controversy surrounding a separate recognition of the history of African Americans is with us again. Throughout this month, schools, the news media, museums, businesses and other institutions will highlight the, legacy and heroes and heroines of black America. Alabama Public Television, to cite just one example, has . . . → Read More: The Historical Record