Wallace Wounded this Cousin, but Change Helped Him Heal

George Wallace is dead and like many Americans, I am saddened by his departure. George Corley Wallace touched the lives of nearly every American. Governor Wallace touched my life in a rather profound way: he was family. I grew up in Bullock County, Alabama. Our oral family history recognized that George Wallace’s . . . → Read More: Wallace Wounded this Cousin, but Change Helped Him Heal

James’ Appointments Troubling

In Alabama, racial tensions are manifest in all political and government activities, social and religious life, public and private educational institutions, the criminal justice system and nearly all economic matters. Given these tensions, it is not surprising that Governor James came under criticism for not appointing blacks to his staff.

There are only two . . . → Read More: James’ Appointments Troubling

James, Moore Should Resign

The duplicity manifested in Judge Roy Moore’s and Governor Fob James’ public statements threatening to defy the lawful order of the courts renders both men unfit to continue serving in their respective offices. They should resign, so that their offices can be filled by officials who abide by their oath to uphold the constitution . . . → Read More: James, Moore Should Resign

Black Voices Not Heard in Campaign

Who is speaking to the issues of particular interest to 35 million African Americans in the 1996 presidential campaigns? What happened to the voice of two-time presidential candidate Jesse Jackson? Where is the reasoned voice of President Clinton’s golfing buddy, Vernon Jordan? And here in Alabama, who is speaking politically for over one million . . . → Read More: Black Voices Not Heard in Campaign

Obsession: Focus on Race Drives Montgomery Politics

These are the best of times and the worst of times for race relations in America. Opinion and political polls suggest that the most popular man in the country is Colin Powell, a retired U.S. Army General and millionaire author. At the same time, arguably the most infamous man in America may be O.J. . . . → Read More: Obsession: Focus on Race Drives Montgomery Politics

Events In Selma Changed Our World

The recent re-enactment of the Selma to Montgomery March commemorating the 1965 Voting Rights March created reflections and caused comparisons. Older people reflected upon their lives thirty years ago, while young people tried to grasp the significance of that historic event.

Much has changed in thirty years. Then, Governor George Wallace was determined to . . . → Read More: Events In Selma Changed Our World

Court Settlement Best For Alabama

Speaking about self rule, Winston Churchill once jested, “Democracy is the worst form of government in the world, except all the other forms.”

Democracy as we understand it began on a rocky land-mass projecting into the Mediterranean at the base of Europe. It was there about 2,500 years ago that Greek tribes took control . . . → Read More: Court Settlement Best For Alabama

Heflin Took True Stand For Equality

Senator Howell Heflin recently stated that he will seek a fourth term. That he will run again for the U.S. Senate may surprise many Alabamians, especially since most of the state’s political observers, analysts, and pundits wrote an end to Senator Heflin’s political career last July 22nd. That’s the day he took to the . . . → Read More: Heflin Took True Stand For Equality

Writing, Thinking, Guinier’s Crimes

Major Cox and Lani Guinier. Martha's Vineyard, August 1993.

Did President Clinton need to sacrifice Lani Guinier, his long time friend and Yale Law School classmate, whom he nominated to head the Justice Department’s Civil Right Division? Were her ideas, as Mr. Clinton claims, “antidemocratic and very difficult to defend?” I think not. . . . → Read More: Writing, Thinking, Guinier’s Crimes

Writing, Thinking, Guinier’s Crimes

Major Cox and Lani Guinier

Did President Clinton need to sacrifice Lani Guinier, his long time friend and Yale Law School classmate, whom he nominated to head the Justice Department’s Civil Right Division? Were her ideas, as Mr. Clinton claims, “antidemocratic and very difficult to defend?” I think not. I’m reminded of what . . . → Read More: Writing, Thinking, Guinier’s Crimes