Gap of Opinion on Flinn Case Wider than B-52 She Flew

American opinion is divided over the way the Air Force handled the case of 1stLt Kelly Flinn. Lt Flinn, an Air Force B-52 bomber pilot, resigned under pressure from the Secretary of the Air Force with less than an honorable discharge because she had an adulterous relationship.

As with the O.J. Simpson case, everyone . . . → Read More: Gap of Opinion on Flinn Case Wider than B-52 She Flew

Celebrity of film role rests easily on Sawyer’s shoulders

John Sawyer aka Shadrack, Photo – David Bundy-Advertiser Staff

On July 10, 1997, the headline above his photograph on the front page of the Montgomery Advertiser read, “Local man to star in feature film.” That is the day fate plucked John Franklin Sawyer from life as a retired U.S. postal service worker and . . . → Read More: Celebrity of film role rests easily on Sawyer’s shoulders

Female Buffalo Soldier Lived Life of Excitement, Inspiration

I recently ran across the interesting story of Cathay Williams, a female buffalo soldier. I became interested in this legendary woman after a neighbor brought an article about her to my attention. Cathay Williams was born into slavery around Independence, Missouri, in 1842. Her mother was a slave named Martha Williams and her father is unknown, some researchers believe he was a manumitted Negro. . . . → Read More: Female Buffalo Soldier Lived Life of Excitement, Inspiration

Jordan Learned Early to Appreciate Wealth

Vernon Evlion Jordan Jr. is his name. He is one of the most powerful men in the country. At age 62, Jordan sits on the board of 11 major corporations. He spends his leisure time with his buddy, the President of the most powerful nation in the world. Vernon Jordan has never held public . . . → Read More: Jordan Learned Early to Appreciate Wealth

Maxwell Book Wins Plaudits

Six years ago, historians, Wesley Phillips Newton and Jerome A. Ennels, proposed a series of articles on the history of Maxwell Air Force Base to the Advertiser. The series that began in 1992, ended on October 8 1997 at a book signing and reception for the authors of “The Wisdom of Eagles: A History . . . → Read More: Maxwell Book Wins Plaudits

Sous La Terre: Montgomery’s Underground Jazz Club

If you are a jazz aficionado and have never been to Sous La Terre, you owe it to yourself to go downtown one Friday or Saturday night and listen to Henry Pugh, Jr. play at this “Downtown-Underground” jazz club. For a quarter of a century, this Jazzman has entertained Montgomery’s jazz fans.

Henry Pugh . . . → Read More: Sous La Terre: Montgomery’s Underground Jazz Club

Strikers Serious About Stand

The sun was hot on the UPS picket line, but the heat had not weakened the resolve of the strikers I spoke with. These Teamsters were determined to narrow the wage gap between part-time and full-time workers. The men I spoke with (I didn’t see any women strikers), last Wednesday, said they are committed . . . → Read More: Strikers Serious About Stand

Role Models Meet To Bid Farewell To One Of Their Own

I recently attended funeral services for Bernice Hill Gray. The atmosphere of the services, attracting hundreds of veterans of the Civil Rights movement, reminded me of another occasion: the ninetieth birthday party of legendary civil-rights activist, Virginia Durr, when I first met Mrs. Gray. That is because both, Mrs. Durr’s 1993 Martha’s Vineyard birthday . . . → Read More: Role Models Meet To Bid Farewell To One Of Their Own

What’s Wrong With Biracial Label?

In 1967, the United States Supreme Court declared state laws banning interracial marriage unconstitutional [Loving vs. Commonwealth of Virginia]. This decision opened the courthouse door for men and women of different races to marry, procreate and bring up their legitimate children anywhere in the United States. According to the 1992 U.S. Census, there are . . . → Read More: What’s Wrong With Biracial Label?

Heroic Act: Floyd Mann Stood Out Among Alabama Lawmen

Traditionally, during Black History month, the spotlight is on Americans with African ancestry. It is this exclusive aspect of black history month that continues to trouble this columnist. The quandary is this: how do we recognize an acknowledged hero of the civil rights movement even though he claimed no African ancestry.

On May 20, . . . → Read More: Heroic Act: Floyd Mann Stood Out Among Alabama Lawmen