Nicknames Boost Political Careers

General Colin Luther Powell has attained a status usually reserved for the most acclaimed members in our society. He is recognized by his last name; Powell. Pondering the presidency on the Tonight show with Jay Leno, Powell let it be known that he had always wanted to be called “Skip.” General Dwight David Eisenhower, . . . → Read More: Nicknames Boost Political Careers

The Lawyer Most Responsible for Dismantling Segregation

This year marks forty years since Rosa Parks refused to relinquish her seat on a Montgomery City bus to a white man. Then, Alabama law required African American passengers to stand-up so that white riders could sit down when all seats were filled. Today, it is hard to imagine the Montgomery of 1955. Those . . . → Read More: The Lawyer Most Responsible for Dismantling Segregation

Distinguished Duo Leads City Group

Recent news of legendary civil rights figure, Johnnie Carr, and retired Air Force general, Charles ‘Chick’ Cleveland taking leadership of One Montgomery, Inc. inspires reflection on the lives of these two very special people. Both, Mrs. Carr and Gen. Cleveland, are well known to many readers of this column. The fact that they were chosen as co-chairs of One Montgomery is no surprise to those of us who know them. . . . → Read More: Distinguished Duo Leads City Group

Another August Birthday To Honor

Two Alabama babies, a boy in Barbour County and a girl in Montgomery County, were born seventy-five years ago this past August.

The boy baby, George Corley Wallace, spent most of his adult life doing battle with ideas in the political arena. The life and times of Governor Wallace are well documented. He used . . . → Read More: Another August Birthday To Honor

Nixon Lacked Mark of Real Racist

After Richard Nixon’s May 1994 death, commentators used the term “complex” when attempting to characterize his life. Certainly, most observers of Nixon’s political career knew he was not to be trusted, and the late H.R. Haldeman’s diaries tell us why. While serving as White House chief of staff to the former president, Mr. Haldeman . . . → Read More: Nixon Lacked Mark of Real Racist

Guinier’s Public Career Not Over Yet

Major Cox and Lani Guinier. Martha's Vineyard, August 1993.

Since Lani Guinier’s failed nomination for Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights, she has become a celebrity. Ms. Guinier has become so famous that she hired an agent to manage her celebrity.

According to an article in the Washington Post, she receives 15 to . . . → Read More: Guinier’s Public Career Not Over Yet

Heflin Took True Stand For Equality

Senator Howell Heflin recently stated that he will seek a fourth term. That he will run again for the U.S. Senate may surprise many Alabamians, especially since most of the state’s political observers, analysts, and pundits wrote an end to Senator Heflin’s political career last July 22nd. That’s the day he took to the . . . → Read More: Heflin Took True Stand For Equality

Summering on Martha’s Vineyard

You hear a lot about Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, in the news lately. Martha’s Vineyard is a 100 square mile size island, located off the southern coast of Cape Cod. The population of the island is less than that of Bullock County, Alabama or about 9,000 permanent residents but during the summer tourist season, the . . . → Read More: Summering on Martha’s Vineyard

A Birthday Tribute to Virginia Foster Durr

Virginia Durr at her birthday party in 1993

Studs Terkel characterized Virginia Foster Durr in the introduction to her autobiography, Outside The Magic Circle, as a “well brought-up Southern white woman” who stepped outside the magic circle, abandoned privilege, and challenged the traditional Southern way of life. Were it not for Virginia’s work . . . → Read More: A Birthday Tribute to Virginia Foster Durr

Writing, Thinking, Guinier’s Crimes

Major Cox and Lani Guinier. Martha's Vineyard, August 1993.

Did President Clinton need to sacrifice Lani Guinier, his long time friend and Yale Law School classmate, whom he nominated to head the Justice Department’s Civil Right Division? Were her ideas, as Mr. Clinton claims, “antidemocratic and very difficult to defend?” I think not. . . . → Read More: Writing, Thinking, Guinier’s Crimes