Interracial Marriage

Alabama is the last state to have a constitutional ban of interracial marriage. While no longer enforceable due to its conflict with US Law, many Alabamians want the archaic language removed from the state’s constitution. Major Cox has written on this and related topics on numerous occasions. He and Margaret, his wife, have appeared on television . . . → Read More: Interracial Marriage

Voters to Decide Future of Interracial Marriage Ban, Alabama Last State to have Law on Books

Lawyers, partners, husband and wife, Alison and Henry Penick smile at each other in their Birmingham law office recently. The couple are technically violating Alabama’s state Constitution, which forbids interracial marriage. The US Supreme Court nullified such laws more than 30 years ago, but some believe the law should be removed to demonstrate Alabama’s progress . . . → Read More: Voters to Decide Future of Interracial Marriage Ban, Alabama Last State to have Law on Books

Ending Interracial Marriage Ban ought to be no-brainer

Recent news stories about removing the ban against interracial marriage from the Alabama constitution prompted me to write this column. Alabama has not enforced the ban since 1958 when the U.S. Supreme Court declared Virginia’s ban against interracial marriage unconstitutional in the case of Loving v. Virginia.

The Montgomery Advertiser reported results of the . . . → Read More: Ending Interracial Marriage Ban ought to be no-brainer

Lovings Case’s Lessons Linger

According to various news accounts, early on the morning of July 15, 1958, Richard and Mildred Loving awoke in their bed with three flashlights shining in their eyes. A voice behind the lights demanded, “What are you doing in bed with this lady?”

“I am his wife,” Mildred answered. Richard pointed to their five . . . → Read More: Lovings Case’s Lessons Linger